Scholastic Musings

Examining Meyer’s Footwork Diagrams: The Divided Circle

Examining Meyer’s Footwork Diagrams: The Divided Circle

While Meyer is more specific than most German masters on the topic of footwork, there is still a lot left unsaid within his various texts on how and where one should move.  Throughout the text, though, he does provide at least some diagramatic assistance on footwork, generally scattered throughout his illustrations. One of the mostRead more about Examining Meyer’s Footwork Diagrams: The Divided Circle[…]

Back to Basics 1 – Fundamentals and Footwork in Meyer

Back to Basics 1 – Fundamentals and Footwork in Meyer

Our first look at the basics will concentrate on a few of the fundamentals of the Meyer system, particularly with an eye to contrasting them with earlier traditions and establishing a firm foundation upon which we will build our art. The learning objectives for this post are to gain an understanding of: Meyers divisions ofRead more about Back to Basics 1 – Fundamentals and Footwork in Meyer[…]

If you can’t do it slow then you can’t do it fast… properly

If you can’t do it slow then you can’t do it fast… properly

  I wrote this response at an ungodly hour of the morning after coming across the this blog post at the Fight With All Your Strength website, a blog which describes itself as “Physical Training and Biomechanics for Swordplay and other Combat Sports and Martial Arts.”  On this occasion I find that I have toRead more about If you can’t do it slow then you can’t do it fast… properly[…]

Stand Back, I’m about to do… SCIENCE!

Stand Back, I’m about to do… SCIENCE!

“When this baby hits 88 miles per hour, you’re going to see some serious sh!t…” Emmett ‘Doc’ Brown Caveat: If you don’t care about maths of physics at all, stop reading now, however a better understanding of some simple physics will improve your understanding of which cut to apply when.  Not to mention the fact thatRead more about Stand Back, I’m about to do… SCIENCE![…]

Meyer’s Longsword: On Parrying

Meyer’s Longsword: On Parrying

In general terms deflecting the opponent’s sword comes under the term “parrying”, though you may also encounter the term “setting aside”, as well as the German words “absetzen” or “versetzen” (which basically mean setting aside or displacing).  Meyer himself tends to describe all parrying using absetzen/versetzen, but in other texts there are very specific passagesRead more about Meyer’s Longsword: On Parrying[…]